A Fall Card with a Rolling Ink Water Technique

September was full of challenges, meetings, online training, travel, a car wreck, and sickness. With everything going on, I have missed out on Craft Roulette. When I heard that my sweet friend, Julie the Great, was on the show, I made a point to be home and decided to let the creative juices flow while I watched. When the show was over, I was pleasantly surprised with the result.

This card may look overwhelmingly complicated, but it is just a stack of paper layers that have been decorated using some simple stamping techniques. One of these is the rolling ink technique – also known as rock’n’roll stamping.

In my video tutorial, I share how these layers came together and show you how to create those beautiful leaves with a few inks, a roll of the stamp, and a spritz of water. After you have viewed the video, you can read more about how it came together.

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Each week, Craft Roulette doles out a set of parameters that must be followed. Here is what the wheel chose for all the creators this week. (I love Julie’s face! She already has a few ideas flowing.)

While Julie and Mary created live online, I started pulling out paper scraps from my bin. I grabbed some vintage yellowed Noteworthy paper, some distressed watercolor cardstock, a few leaf stamps, a postage cancelation stamp, a stencil, and some waterbrushes.

For my yellow background, I chose the Noteworthy paper. This paper pack is a really fun one to have in your collection. One side of the paper has an aged look while the other is clean and white.

I knew that I wanted to make a vintage-looking fall card with some of my favorite leaf stamps. One of my favorite stamping techniques to use with leaves is the rolling or rock’n’roll technique.

This involves inking your stamp into one color of ink, then rolling the edges into another.

I decided to take it a step farther by rolling the stamps into a third color and adding a spritz of water before stamping it onto my watercolor cardstock.

The water allowed the inks to blend a little and meld together forming a beautiful variation of color on each of the leaves.

The rest of the card came together using paper scraps and a stamped leaf image. One of the parameters was a postage stamp, which I didn’t have, so I ended up using a postage cancellation stamp on the leaf. It reminded me of some of those aged, retro stickers you find in the craft stores.

I am so glad that I was able to watch my friends create and join the fun. I hope that this project inspired you to try something new and give this technique a try. If you have any questions about this project, feel free to post them in the comments below.

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here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Add More Photos With Interactive Layouts

In April, our daughter had photos taken by Charlotte Sophia and sent the album link to me. There were over SEVENTY stunning photos, and I could not decide how to scrapbook the photos. Do I create a mini-album or make multiple pages? Do I just pick my top ten then frame a few?

Now I know that you have all faced a dilemma just like this. As I was trying to decide what to make, I was inspired by a layout in the Magic How-To book and I was determined to create a layout with interactive pages.

Can you believe that I was able to place twenty-two photos on this layout? This was achieved through the use of flip-flaps. Now if you have never heard of flip-flaps, you are going to want to run over to my website as soon as you learn about them.

These wonderful little inventions allow you to add more photos, journaling, and memorabilia to your scrapbook layouts AND they come in multiple sizes and orientations. When designing this layout, I had planned to use some 3″ Flip-Flaps to create a mini-book, an 8×12 Flap on the left side, and retro-fit a 6×12 Flip Flap on the right. Unfortunately, like most of my ideas, it didn’t go as planned.

As you watch the video, you will see the little mistakes that I made and how I fixed them.

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My goal was to create a clean, simple layout using a large number of photos. I didn’t want it to feel jumbled or be too much for the eye to handle. How do you think I did?

On the left side of the layout, I retrofit an 8.5×11 page protector to fit my page to create the interactive flap. I added two focal point photos on the front with a few floral elements and pattern papers. This is the page you see first, so I wanted to keep it clean and match the theme of the photos.

On the back, I added some more photos with a few pocket cards. I love using pocket cards on my layouts. On this page, I cut one down for a sentiment and used three others as photo mats. In the video, I share how I cut the pocket cards so that I could use the rest on the other side of the layout.

It is important to remember to create visual triangles and repeat patterns and colors throughout your interactive layouts. As I was planning these pages, I wanted to create flow and a cohesive feel.

I added floral images on every page, duplicated patterns and colors, and created visual triangles with stickers and pocket cards.

On the right side of the layout, I added a large floral sticker with kraft-colored leaves. On all of the pages, you will see these floral images repeated on both the open and closed flaps of the layout.

I added even more photos to this layout by creating a little book with three-inch flip flaps. It opens up to reveal some beautiful images of my daughter and her fiancΓ©.

As I was planning these pages, I wanted to make sure that I had room for journaling. I decided to create little pockets behind the smaller photos with tags inside. On each of the tags are facebook posts that they wrote to each other talking about how much they care for one another.


Twenty-two photos on one scrapbook layout, and it turned out beautifully!

I want to thank Charlotte Sophia once again for such beautiful photos. I hope that this page does them justice. If you have any questions about the video tutorial or the layout, please feel free to comment below.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Tuesday Tip: Create a Swatch Book

Do you keep track of all the markers, paints, pencils, and inks you own OR do you trust you can find them in your craft space and hope that you don’t buy doubles when your favorite craft store has a sale? If you are looking for a way to keep track and stay a little more organized, then today’s Tuesday Tip is for you.

In my latest Craft Space Tour, I briefly mentioned my Swatch Binder. Today, I am going to show you how I use this book and share ways that you can make a few swatches of your own.


For those who are new to color swatching, let me explain what these are and how I use them. Swatches allow you to see the dried result of a specific medium – paint, ink, gel, spray, etc. When you create a swatch, you can see the variety of tints, gradients, and patterns in that medium.

I keep all of my swatches in my planner because it travels with me everywhere. When I shop, I can check my swatches to see if I already own a specific color. When I am crafting, I use my swatches to match my papers or cardstock to the medium I plan on using.

In the video, I show how I create swatches for Spectrum Noir Triblends and Watercolor Paints. The alcohol marker swatches are self-explanitory. I simply shade in the area with the color label.

Watercolors are swatched a little differently. When I use watercolors, I can change the shade of the pigment by adding more water. I created my swatches to show the variation of pigment to water ratios.

I have labeled both my watercolor swatches and my watercolor palette using a label maker. This may seem a bit tedious, but it is much easier for people to read the labels when I am teaching in-person and online.

Once I have completed a swatch sheet, I use a Disc Punch to add it to my planner. If you don’t want to use a disc planner, you can create a three-ring binder full of swatches or add it to an artist’s notebook.

No matter how you organize your swatches, they will be a great reference for you. If you would like to learn how to create a swatch book of your own, go ahead and watch today’s Tuesday Tip!

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My swatch book stays in my craft space and goes with me when I shop and go to weekend retreats. I keep it near when I am crafting so that I can see which colors will go best with a pattern paper I am using. These swatches also come in handy when my favorite craft shop is having a sale. No more buying doubles of my favorite ink or marker. πŸ˜‰

I hope that today’s Tuesday Tip inspired you to create a swatch book of your own. If you have already made one, I would like to know how you store your swatches. Feel free to comment below and tell me about your swatch book or post any questions you have.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)