Fifteen Paper Flower Techniques on a Christmas Wreath

It’s time for another Creative Design Team video series! This month, our team is sharing a variety of Christmas in July creations with you. If you have not had a chance to meet our team, you can view each of their channels by clicking on the Creative Design Team link in the menu above.


Today, I am sharing Fifteen Paper Flower making tips with you as I show you how to create this Christmas Clothespin Wreath. In the video, you will learn how to use up some of your paper scraps to create a holiday wreath and learn a few ways to dress up those paper flowers.

This wreath is very easy to make using wooden clothespins and a wire wreath frame. I used a mixture of patterns from the White Pines collection and Holiday Stack on my clothespins along with images from our Flower Market Cricut collection to create the wreath. This is a great project to use up those paper scraps you have from last Christmas.   

I like to use the 6×6 Paper Stacks for projects like this because the patterns are scaled down from the original design. The smaller pattern works well with the size of the clothespins making it easier to see the holiday images.

Each paper strip was cut to the size of the clothespin, then adhered to the top using a Matte Gel medium. In the video, I share a few adhesive options, but this Matte Gel is my favorite option for adhering paper to raw wood. I have added links to all the adhesives I show in the supply list at the end of this post.

If you want to make a wreath of your own or plan on using this design for a workshop, you might be wondering how many clothespins to purchase. Here is how you can determine what you will need for your wreath.

Diameter of Wreath X 3.14 = Total Number of 1″ Clothespins (12″ x 3.14 = 37.5)

Total 1″ Clothespins X 2 = Total Number of 1/2″ Clothespins (37.5 X 2 = 75)

For Two Layers of Clothespins Multiply by Two (75 X 2 = 150)

I found a batch of 50 clothespins for $0.97 each, and the wreath form was purchased at a dollar store, so this hardly cost me anything at all to make. It’s costs hardly anything if you choose to use paper scraps.


The next step is my favorite step – Decorating the Wreath with Paper Flowers! In the video, you will learn FIFTEEN of my favorite paper flower-making tricks. After you have watched the video, I will share my top three tips with you in detail.

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Did you enjoy the tutorial? How about the Flower-Making Tips? Those are always my favorite to share. When I began teaching online five years ago, I posted individual paper flower tutorials, and I had forgotten how much I enjoyed those. Every time I teach how to create paper flowers, these are the top five tips I always share.

Use Ink to Add Depth & Dimension

When you cut out a three-dimensional flower using your Cricut or die-cut machine, it is usually one-dimensional and one color. To add shadows and depth, I use ink, shimmer sprays, or paint.

I add layers of color to the edges and centers of both sides of the die-cut flowers and leaves. To create a natural vein, I fold the petals or leaves down the center and apply color to the fold adding just another level of dimension to my flower.

Alternate Thick & Thin Foam Tape

When I create flowers for home dΓ©cor pieces or a big bulky card, I alternate thin and thick foam tape between the layers. Sometimes, I double the layers of foam tape for a fluffy flower in full bloom.

Some of the layers do not have any foam tape at all. If I want to create depth and shadow, I will adhere a few layers flat against the bottom layer. On my berries, I added foam tape to a few of the buds and left the others flat against the background layer. This adds to the realistic look of the flower image.

Think Outside the Box

This might be hard for some of you, but when it comes to creating something unique, you need to think outside the box! Explore ideas that are creative and unusual and are not limited by rules. To be honest, I hate rules. If you tell me I have to do something, I will probably try to do the opposite (this coming from the lady with degrees in accounting and paralegal).

What I am trying to say is: When you are creating something new, try something unexpected. On my flowers, I used liquid pearls for berry tips, beads for pistils, vellum for petals, oxide ink for snow, and a button for the center of a flower. It’s all one big trip to Wonderland, but it looks astounding because it is unique.


I hope that today’s project inspired you and that you give one of these fifteen flower-making techniques a try. Don’t forget to check out all the other Creative Design Team Christmas in July creations. You are going to be inspired to create something new!

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here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Tuesday Tip: Create a Swatch Book

Do you keep track of all the markers, paints, pencils, and inks you own OR do you trust you can find them in your craft space and hope that you don’t buy doubles when your favorite craft store has a sale? If you are looking for a way to keep track and stay a little more organized, then today’s Tuesday Tip is for you.

In my latest Craft Space Tour, I briefly mentioned my Swatch Binder. Today, I am going to show you how I use this book and share ways that you can make a few swatches of your own.


For those who are new to color swatching, let me explain what these are and how I use them. Swatches allow you to see the dried result of a specific medium – paint, ink, gel, spray, etc. When you create a swatch, you can see the variety of tints, gradients, and patterns in that medium.

I keep all of my swatches in my planner because it travels with me everywhere. When I shop, I can check my swatches to see if I already own a specific color. When I am crafting, I use my swatches to match my papers or cardstock to the medium I plan on using.

In the video, I show how I create swatches for Spectrum Noir Triblends and Watercolor Paints. The alcohol marker swatches are self-explanitory. I simply shade in the area with the color label.

Watercolors are swatched a little differently. When I use watercolors, I can change the shade of the pigment by adding more water. I created my swatches to show the variation of pigment to water ratios.

I have labeled both my watercolor swatches and my watercolor palette using a label maker. This may seem a bit tedious, but it is much easier for people to read the labels when I am teaching in-person and online.

Once I have completed a swatch sheet, I use a Disc Punch to add it to my planner. If you don’t want to use a disc planner, you can create a three-ring binder full of swatches or add it to an artist’s notebook.

No matter how you organize your swatches, they will be a great reference for you. If you would like to learn how to create a swatch book of your own, go ahead and watch today’s Tuesday Tip!

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My swatch book stays in my craft space and goes with me when I shop and go to weekend retreats. I keep it near when I am crafting so that I can see which colors will go best with a pattern paper I am using. These swatches also come in handy when my favorite craft shop is having a sale. No more buying doubles of my favorite ink or marker. πŸ˜‰

I hope that today’s Tuesday Tip inspired you to create a swatch book of your own. If you have already made one, I would like to know how you store your swatches. Feel free to comment below and tell me about your swatch book or post any questions you have.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Start with a Sketch & Create Some Bird-Day Cards

Each month, our Creative Design Team shares simple project ideas with you that show you ways to use some of the crafty items in your stash. This week, we are focusing on Sketches! Each one of us has chosen a sketch from a Make It From Your Heart how-to book and showing you new ways to use them.

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For my project, I chose to use a card sketch from the new Make it From Your Heart book. This new how-to guide is full of card and layout sketches with cutting guides and project samples. Each of our how-to books are designed to give you a “jumping off point” in the creative process and help you to create beautiful projects of your own.

The bird-day cards I created were inspired by Sketch #30 which is a simple design with three paper strips in the background. As you can see, I was able to take this uncomplicated design and use it to create three adorable birthday cards.

Each of these cards is a little different from the rest. In the MIFYH book, there is an A2 horizontal sample and an A2 vertical sample with playful papers, icons, and sentiments. In my video tutorial, I share how I was inspired by each sample in the book and how it altered it for my designs.

I chose the bright, whimsical Party Time paper and sticker pack for my card collection and paired them with the So Tweet bird images. Aren’t those little birds simply adorable?!

In our idea book, all of the bird images are shaded a lovely yellow color. I chose to mimic this on two of my cards using SpectrumNoir Triblend markers. I used my swatch sheet to match my marker colors to the paper pack, then went right to work shading those little bird images.

On the first card, I chose pink patterns and images to create a card for a little girl. I added some stitching on the side, a few layered tags, and a sticker sentiment.

Her balloon was shaded a lovely pale pink and coral mixture with a splash of shimmer from a shimmer brush. I am still practicing my coloring and shading techniques so I kept my blends simple.

The Party Time paper pack has both pink and blue designs so, naturally, the second card was created with a boy theme in mind. That little chick with the glasses is just too cute dressed up in his little party hat sticker.

This card is a bit more elaborate with a pattern paper background, glitter gel polka-dots, and stitched strips of paper.

After creating the two standard-size cards, I decided to use the sketch to create a slimline design. Instead of using a little yellow chick, I went rogue with a beautiful little bluebird.

That adorable bird was placed onto a scallop tag adorned with Liquid Pearls, then added to a simple card background of pink images and sentiments.

If you would like to see how all three of these cards came together and learn a few tips & tricks, I have a video for you to enjoy. I walk you through how I shaded each of the images with TriBlend markers and share how I altered each of the sketches in the Make It From Your Heart book.

Please take a few minutes to hit the subscribe button so that you are notified when I add another video.

I hope that today’s project inspired you to take another look at some sketches from the Make It From Your Heart how-to books. Each of the Creative Design Team members will be sharing a sketch with you this week, so make sure that you have subscribed to each of their channels so that you can learn a new way to Start with a Sketch.

Follow me on BlogLovin’

Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)