Craft Space Tour: Paper, Cardstock, & Stamps

Welcome back to my craft space! I hope you enjoyed last week’s tour of my Cricut & Sizzix crafting space showing where I store Cricut tools and materials and dies and embossing folders. If you missed it, you can view it on My Craft Space page.

This week, I am sharing how I organize my pattern paper, cardstock, specialty paper, and stamps. I will also show you how I organize my growing collection of paper scraps, flip-flaps, and memory protectors.

Each week, I will be sharing an area of my craft space and how I have organized my 9’x9′ craft space using handmade and repurposed objects. After you watch this week’s tour, make sure to continue reading so that you can learn more about my paper and stamp organization systems.

Learn More About the Items in my Craft Space

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In my first video, I shared the space above my desk where I store my paper samples. These samples are separated by theme, and those themes match the labels on my pattern paper holders.

The paper storage boxes store retired papers that I am holding onto for future projects. The desk paper shelves store current paper for classes, live videos, or blog projects.

I like to keep them pattern paper separated so that I know which paper is currently available on my website for those who are making my class projects. It is always frustrating for someone when they learn that a paper pattern is no longer available after I show them how to make a project.

Above those pattern papers, I have cardstock. These are also stored in plastic paper handlers and sorted by color. In between each color, I have a tabbed envelope that is used to label the color and hold paper scraps.

I also have a box of specialty papers on the lower shelf and in a drawer on my mixed media table. I will be sharing more about that area next week.

In the video, I also share how I store my 6×6 papers, my card bases, and my flip-flaps and memory protectors. If you would like a copy of the file I use to label my memory protector files, you can find it here. I used Avery Label # for these labels.


I also shared with you my stamp organization system. I keep my stamp collection small and I purge often. Every year, companies introduce new stamps and, as much as I would like to, I cannot keep them all. Every two months, I sort through the collection and gift them away or sell them online at a discount.

The ones I do keep, are stored in these paper storage boxes. If you are not a fan of the paper storage boxes, or need more ideas for storing stamps – I have another quick organizing idea for you. You can read about it here.

I keep track of the stamps I keep in Evernote. In the video, I give you a quick tutorial of how I use Evernote to catalog my stamped images. I love how I can pull up the catalog on all my devices and search for an image or sentiment and find the stamp I need.

I hope that you have enjoyed these craft space tours and that they have helped you in your craft room. If you have any questions about the items shown or how I organized my paper and stamps, please feel free to comment below.

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here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Fifteen Paper Flower Techniques on a Christmas Wreath

It’s time for another Creative Design Team video series! This month, our team is sharing a variety of Christmas in July creations with you. If you have not had a chance to meet our team, you can view each of their channels by clicking on the Creative Design Team link in the menu above.


Today, I am sharing Fifteen Paper Flower making tips with you as I show you how to create this Christmas Clothespin Wreath. In the video, you will learn how to use up some of your paper scraps to create a holiday wreath and learn a few ways to dress up those paper flowers.

This wreath is very easy to make using wooden clothespins and a wire wreath frame. I used a mixture of patterns from the White Pines collection and Holiday Stack on my clothespins along with images from our Flower Market Cricut collection to create the wreath. This is a great project to use up those paper scraps you have from last Christmas.   

I like to use the 6×6 Paper Stacks for projects like this because the patterns are scaled down from the original design. The smaller pattern works well with the size of the clothespins making it easier to see the holiday images.

Each paper strip was cut to the size of the clothespin, then adhered to the top using a Matte Gel medium. In the video, I share a few adhesive options, but this Matte Gel is my favorite option for adhering paper to raw wood. I have added links to all the adhesives I show in the supply list at the end of this post.

If you want to make a wreath of your own or plan on using this design for a workshop, you might be wondering how many clothespins to purchase. Here is how you can determine what you will need for your wreath.

Diameter of Wreath X 3.14 = Total Number of 1″ Clothespins (12″ x 3.14 = 37.5)

Total 1″ Clothespins X 2 = Total Number of 1/2″ Clothespins (37.5 X 2 = 75)

For Two Layers of Clothespins Multiply by Two (75 X 2 = 150)

I found a batch of 50 clothespins for $0.97 each, and the wreath form was purchased at a dollar store, so this hardly cost me anything at all to make. It’s costs hardly anything if you choose to use paper scraps.


The next step is my favorite step – Decorating the Wreath with Paper Flowers! In the video, you will learn FIFTEEN of my favorite paper flower-making tricks. After you have watched the video, I will share my top three tips with you in detail.

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Did you enjoy the tutorial? How about the Flower-Making Tips? Those are always my favorite to share. When I began teaching online five years ago, I posted individual paper flower tutorials, and I had forgotten how much I enjoyed those. Every time I teach how to create paper flowers, these are the top five tips I always share.

Use Ink to Add Depth & Dimension

When you cut out a three-dimensional flower using your Cricut or die-cut machine, it is usually one-dimensional and one color. To add shadows and depth, I use ink, shimmer sprays, or paint.

I add layers of color to the edges and centers of both sides of the die-cut flowers and leaves. To create a natural vein, I fold the petals or leaves down the center and apply color to the fold adding just another level of dimension to my flower.

Alternate Thick & Thin Foam Tape

When I create flowers for home décor pieces or a big bulky card, I alternate thin and thick foam tape between the layers. Sometimes, I double the layers of foam tape for a fluffy flower in full bloom.

Some of the layers do not have any foam tape at all. If I want to create depth and shadow, I will adhere a few layers flat against the bottom layer. On my berries, I added foam tape to a few of the buds and left the others flat against the background layer. This adds to the realistic look of the flower image.

Think Outside the Box

This might be hard for some of you, but when it comes to creating something unique, you need to think outside the box! Explore ideas that are creative and unusual and are not limited by rules. To be honest, I hate rules. If you tell me I have to do something, I will probably try to do the opposite (this coming from the lady with degrees in accounting and paralegal).

What I am trying to say is: When you are creating something new, try something unexpected. On my flowers, I used liquid pearls for berry tips, beads for pistils, vellum for petals, oxide ink for snow, and a button for the center of a flower. It’s all one big trip to Wonderland, but it looks astounding because it is unique.


I hope that today’s project inspired you and that you give one of these fifteen flower-making techniques a try. Don’t forget to check out all the other Creative Design Team Christmas in July creations. You are going to be inspired to create something new!

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

An Easter Egg Cloche | Easter Video Collab

Last month, our Creative Design Team was showing you multiple ways to love your stash. This month, we took a little break from the everyday posts to bring you some projects you can create for Easter. If you haven’t heard about our Creative Design Team, you learn more about us here.


The women on our team did an amazing job this past week! We had shaker egg cards, and a pop-up card, scrapbook layouts, and easy-to-make last-minute cards. Today, I am ending the collab with a home décor project that you can make with your Cricut.

Please don’t feel overwhelmed by this creation – it is not as difficult as it looks. In my video, I share a few ways you can add pizzazz to your Cricut cuts, but you are more than welcome to skip those parts of the project.

As you may know, I love adding lots of detail to my designs. The flowers I cut from the Daisy Meadows collection are designed to assemble flat or with a little dimension using foam tape.

I chose to go a few steps further. Not only did I cut the images from pattern paper and glitter cardstock, but I also added some beads in the center and cut a stamen using a flower thin cut die. As I said, feel free to skip this step. I am a very detail-oriented person. When I create flowers for home décor pieces, I like to make them bold, whimsical, and full of dimension.

In my video, I also share a few tips and tricks in Design Space. You will learn how I like to use templates and color sync. I also walk you through this entire project from start to finish. You will create it in Design Space with me, assemble all the pieces, and put the cloche together.

All of the Cricut cut items are placed on the base of a cloche around a flower foam square. I chose a cloche with a metal base. It matches the décor in my home and the patterns in the Daisy Meadows collection. I found the bell-shaped cloche stands at Michaels craft store, but I have also seen a few on Amazon you can purchase. I put links below in my supply list to both of these.

So.. here is a little tidbit of history for you. Do you know where the term cloche came from or what they are designed for?

Cloche /klōSH/

Bell shaped jar or bottomless glass jug used in France since the 1600’s. The name for a popular bell shaped hat of the 1920s

Knowing where something comes from or where it originated always fascinates me. As a gardener, I have seen a cloche used, but they are usually made of plastic. I didn’t realize that the glass bells we use in home décor are popular mini-greenhouses.

Alright, so now that you have gotten your history lesson for the week, let’s take a look at the crafting tutorial.

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How much fun was that?! Home Décor is one of my favorite paper crafts to make – it is where I started as a Maker and where my heart will always be.

I especially love teaching others how to make creations for their home. I hope this project inspired you to try a few new things in Cricut Design Space and make something for your home this Easter.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)