An Archery Layout | April Love Your Stash

The Creative Design Team had so many people joining us in February, that we have decided to continue our Love Your Stash series throughout the rest of the year. Not only are we going to be using a few items in our craft spaces, but we are encouraging you to do the same. This month, Katy, Erin, Jayma, and I will be posting some BONUS Love Your Stash videos for you to enjoy. Make sure you check out each of our channels or head on over to the playlist for some inspiration to use up some of your crafting collection.


In March, I had the opportunity to go to a weekend retreat for fun – no hosting, selling, or teaching – just three days of crafting in a beautiful mountain cabin. During my stay, I created several scrapbook pages using elements in my craft stash. One of my favorites is this two-page spread of my son on the archery range.

Rarely do I capture photos of our big ol’ bear. This red-bearded sasquatch of a man tries to avoid the camera whenever he can, but I was able to sneak a few photos during our last outing.

My son was not the only one shooting that day. I also own a bow which he had custom-designed for me to match my Muddy Girl gear. It was my son who introduced me to this sport and I have genuinely come to enjoy it. We visit a local archery range near a lake as often as we can. This is a great way for me to get out of the craft room once in a while.

On this layout, I used quite a few items from my crafting stash. The background was created using some of our Wood Grain papers. To create a three-dimensional background, I cut apart the slats, roughed and inked up the edges, then layered them onto the cardstock to mimic the targets on the archery range.

To add to the distressed roughed-up design, I also tore some edges on the photo frame and added some splatters on a few corners of the layout. I created the splatters with Toffee Ink using a retired stamp. There are a few stamps on my website with some splatter on sale right now or you could use waterbrush with some ink or paint to create the same effect.

The die cuts on the page are a combination of Cricut cut images and embellishments from my crafting space. I wanted to add some arrows onto the page, match the circular shape of his bow, and create movement. While I was at the retreat, I was struggling to find a few other embellishments, and a friend asked if I had any feather stickers. I am so grateful that she suggested these because they were the perfect addition to the layout.

I had brought my little Joy to the retreat, so I was able to cut a few of the images I wanted from the You Are Here and Artistry collections. When my husband gifted me with the Joy, I wasn’t sure if I would use it because of how small it is, but it’s the size of the machine that I have come to like most. It takes up hardly any space in your work area and is so much easier to pack than a larger machine. You are limited in size when you are creating, but most of the images I made that weekend fit within the 5″ x 11.5″ parameters.

The other elements on the pages are from a variety of collections that I have been hoarding. I am a collector of all things outdoorsy and manly, and it felt great to be able to use a few of them on this layout. The final addition was a tag tucked behind a photo for journaling. I have no clue where I got this tag or what collection it comes from, but I have a stack of them that need using. The color and designs on this tag pocket were an ideal choice for the page.


If you wish to see how this layout came together, you can view my process video. It is going to look a little different than my past videos. This is the first time I have set up my camera somewhere outside of my craft space. The background looks a little different and there are a few little bumps that happened when I reached for a snack or when someone at the table moved, but I loved this layout so much and I wanted to be able to share it with you.


I hope that this layout inspired you to use up a few items from your crafting stash. I have sincerely enjoyed being able to use up the pieces in my collection these past few months and I can’t wait to share the other layouts I made at this retreat with you.

Don’t forget to visit Katy, Jayma, and Erin’s channels this week and check out what they have made using items from their crafting collection. Make sure to subscribe to each channel so that you are notified when the Creative Design Team adds more Love Your Stash videos throughout the rest of the year.

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here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

Welcome to the Scandinavian Folk Art Blog Hop

Our team of Makers have some wonderful projects to inspire you using the Scandinavian Folk Art Greetings stamp set. Each month, we show you a variety of ways to use the monthly stamp sets, and, this month, we are showing you how to use these folk art images on your projects.

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What is a blog hop? This is a wonderful way for you to gather a few ideas for using a specific element on your projects. You may be just starting here or you may have come from Kim Loewen’s blog – either way, you are in the right place.  When you are finished viewing my Stenciled Scandinavian cards video tutorial, click the link at the end of my post to “hop” on over to the next website. If you get lost along the way, you will find the complete list of participating consultants on Melinda’s Blog.


I want to be completely honest with you — I almost didn’t purchase this stamp set. When I saw it in the catalog I didn’t think I would ever use it. Boy, was I wrong! The images remind me of some of the stamps from years past, and I found some great ideas for projects in our old idea books. I am so glad I ordered it so that I could share with you how easy these cards are to make.

Both of these cards use stenciled images and heat embossing techniques. In my video, I show you how to assemble each card and share some simple cardmaking tips you can use on your projects. I wanted to keep the designs bright, simple, and unique like a tole-painted image.


The first card uses a color combination that I customarily save for Christmas. I have been taking a class on Color Theory and wanted to try a complementary combination that is not normally in my area of interest.

The patterns on this card are from our Mix-Ins paper pack which also sports the combination of candy apple, fern, and almond. A stenciled background was added using a Cricut cut image I shaded with Peeled Paint Distress Oxide ink. To be truthful, I am still not sure if I like this mix of colors, but it was a fun experiment to try.

The second card is more within my color range. The mix of Peacock, Candy Apple, and Kraft colors can be found throughout my home.

On this card, I also used a stenciled image I cut from our stencil film on my Cricut. The hearts were added using Opaque Texture Paste then “aged” with Toffee ink. I love the row of flowers across the top and that white embossing powder makes them really stand out on the peacock cardstock.

On each of the cards, I added a little stitching to give them a handmade vintage-like feel. I would love to know which design you like best.



If you would like to create a set of these cards or learn how to create a stenciled background for your projects, I have made a tutorial for you to watch. I hope that it inspires you to try something new.  

Now head on over to Krista Hershberger’s blog to see her work! Be sure to visit all of the blogs to get some great crafting tips and other fun ideas.  Don’t forget! The Scandinavian Folk Art Greetings stamp set is only available during the month of April. Contact your CTMH Consultant, or visit my website to learn how you can get this stamp set for FREE as a VIP or at a discounted price of $5.00 with a qualifying order.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.


here is a list of some supplies I used today (View All My Supplies Here)

What’s New in Cricut Design Space?

Have you opened your Design Space lately? There have been quite a few new changes to the program. Usually, I post these updates in my Cricut classroom, but, today, I thought I would share a video tutorial with all of you so that you can learn how to use the new features. Here are just a few of the items I plan to share with you today.


Operation (aka LineType)

In the previous version of Design Space, the word “linetype” was shown in the Edit Bar at the top of the Canvas. This might be a new term for some of you. Linetype refers to the way your machine interacts with the materials you are using – cut, draw, score, deboss, etc.

Each machine has different operation options. The Maker has to most options available, followed by the Explore. The Maker machine will continue to be expanded upon, so this list might change in the future. The Joy machine will only cut and draw, so that will be the only choice available to you.

Next to the Operation, you can choose the material color or tool type. With the recent update, Cricut has changed how you view the lines when you choose certain tools. This gives you a great visual of what the line might look like.

One the left, I have chosen a Marker as my pen. You can see that the line is much thicker than the line on the Fine Point Pen option. This visual will also change when you use the Foil Tool.

You will also see the linetype change on the list of images in the layers panel. The egg image was originally a cut image and the linetype was listed as a “Basic Cut”.

After I changed the Operation to “Print Then Cut” the words next to the images changed in the layers panel.


Offset (the tool we have all been waiting for)

I have been trying to create shadow layers for years in Design Space and using other apps, so you can only imagine my excitement when the new Offset Tool was introduced.

Offset is a new feature located in the Edit Bar at the top of the canvas. You can use this tool with both images and text. In my video, I show you how to use Offset, but I do want to point out a few features for you.

When you select the Offset option, you have a few choices – Distance, Corner, & Weld. Let’s take a look at each of those.

The Distance allows you to chose how large or small you want the offset or inset. As you move the dial you will see a pale line form around or inside the image or text. If you chose an inset, you are creating a set of letters of images that are smaller than your original image.

The Corner option is self-explanatory. This allows you to chose if you want to corners to be rounded or square.

The last option is Weld Offsets. When you are adding an offset/inset it will always be welded or one complete image. If you would like to create individual offsets around each of the letters or images, you can turn this click the checkmark to create those shadow layers.


These are just a few of the new features and tools in the newest updates of Cricut Design Space. I will be featuring a few more in the coming weeks.

In my video tutorial below, I share how to use Operation and Offset and I share three more features and tools you will want to try in Design Space.


If you would like to know more about Cricut Design Space, I would love for you to join my Cricut Classroom. Each week, I share Cricut tips and we create projects in Design Space. I also share papercrafting tips when we create the projects togethers.

I hope today’s tutorial inspired you to open up Design Space and give these new features a try. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments below.

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Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. By clicking on those links and making a purchase, you are helping to support my small business. This is at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.